Validating windows copy

During the process, Tera Copy shows detected errors, and allows you to fix the problem by recopying only the problematic files.

Tera Copy can verify files after they have been copied to ensure that they are identical.

Basically, FCIV calculates MD5 or SHA-1 hash values for files and outputs them either to the screen or to an XML file.

It can also compare files to those checksums saved in XML and tell you if anything differs or is missing.

Your app did in 30 hours what has been taking me weeks and weeks to do piecemeal at a time.

The amount of time I wasted in aborted processes and babysitting file copies easily cost me thousands of dollars in lost productivity and delays in work delivery.

This is done by comparing hashes of source and target files.

Supported algorithms: CRC32, MD5, SHA-1, SHA-256, SHA-512, Panama, Tiger, Ripe MD, Whirlpool and xx Hash.

validating windows copy-3

It didn’t take me long to find the Microsoft File Checksum Integrity Verifier (“FCIV” for short), a nifty little unsupported command-line utility that does exactly what I was looking for.

Copy and Xcopy offer the option of verification (both using the /v parameter) but sadly Robocopy does not.

I’m not sure if verification is just built-in to Robocopy and can’t be disabled, or if it doesn’t exist at all.

Even if you purchase a retail, boxed copy of Windows and install it, that copy of Windows will become tied to your hardware after it activates itself with Microsoft.

If you change your hardware later, your copy of Windows may become “non-genuine,” turn your desktop background black, and start pestering you to use a genuine version of Windows.